Del presente parla
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Mario Milizia
Del presente parla, 2017

wood, 89 x145 x 48 cm
installation view, Viasaterna, Milano

Controcuore is the result of a combination of Milizia’s recent work, carried out using various media at different times, following the modus operandi of an artist who is both inclusive and disruptive, eclectic and specific.

“Controcuore” is the name of the cast-iron structure standing between the fireplace and its marble frame. An element of union, of protection, of adaptation, and also the title of the book in which Milizia brings together some of his poems written in 1992 and the analysis of his DNA, carried out through the Genographic Project with the aim of reconstructing his ancestral origins, which turned out to be Greek, Spanish and Portuguese. These poems have recently been translated into Latin and the languages of those countries, through a linguistic game which rewrites them, reinventing their sense. This is the origin of the seven tapestries on show, onto which the verses are sewn, originally produced using the cut-up technique. A technique drawn on at length, ever since the end of the 1950s, by Brion Gysin and William Borroughs, entailing the physical cutting up of one or more written texts in order to piece the elements back together as needs be.

Thus, poems and tapestries, together with twenty-five small-sized paintings created by spreading a blend of nail varnish and correction fluid onto cut-up pages from the catalogue of the permanent collection of the Carmen Thyssen Museum in Malaga. On the background, there are paintings by Spanish artists; in the foreground, the matter of a painting carried out using everyday substances, blown up and expanded. Chemicals from pigments and for retouching, with which Milizia produces dense, stratified works, shaped by a process of subtraction and superimposition.

Two sculptures complete the exhibition itinerary. One is the upshot of a procedure of absolute reappraisal, culminating in a model of utopian architecture. Like the model of a neo-Renaissance building, it is proportioned and rigorous and yet uninhabited, uninhabitable, suspended between its original function and its current dysfunctionality. The second sculpture, made of bronze and produced thanks to a collaboration with the Battaglia Foundry, replicates and reinterprets a “controcuore” the fireplace cast-iron frame which, once again, displays on its surface the traces of the fusion between different cultures.

The exhibition is thus rooted in a logic of accumulation, collection, aggregation and coagulation. It is driven right to the threshold of chaos, yet without ever losing the discipline of analysis, of the skill which Milizia applies to every gesture, forever calibrated and, most of all, the outcome of a meticulous and encyclopaedic study. It’s a cycle of works on fragments and mutation. On the loss and reconquering of shapes and functions. On the transformative process of actions like translation, cut-ups, restoration, but also of time itself, in the inevitable shifting between past and present, and vice versa.

All this leads to a condition of constant instability, a source of inevitable restlessness, but also of an organic excitement in view of the unknown and that yet to be discovered.

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Controcuore
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Mario Milizia
Controcuore, 2017

Installation view - Courtesy of Viasaterna, Milano

Controcuore is the result of a combination of Milizia’s recent work, carried out using various media at different times, following the modus operandi of an artist who is both inclusive and disruptive, eclectic and specific.

“Controcuore” is the name of the cast-iron structure standing between the fireplace and its marble frame. An element of union, of protection, of adaptation, and also the title of the book in which Milizia brings together some of his poems written in 1992 and the analysis of his DNA, carried out through the Genographic Project with the aim of reconstructing his ancestral origins, which turned out to be Greek, Spanish and Portuguese. These poems have recently been translated into Latin and the languages of those countries, through a linguistic game which rewrites them, reinventing their sense. This is the origin of the seven tapestries on show, onto which the verses are sewn, originally produced using the cut-up technique. A technique drawn on at length, ever since the end of the 1950s, by Brion Gysin and William Borroughs, entailing the physical cutting up of one or more written texts in order to piece the elements back together as needs be.

Thus, poems and tapestries, together with twenty-five small-sized paintings created by spreading a blend of nail varnish and correction fluid onto cut-up pages from the catalogue of the permanent collection of the Carmen Thyssen Museum in Malaga. On the background, there are paintings by Spanish artists; in the foreground, the matter of a painting carried out using everyday substances, blown up and expanded. Chemicals from pigments and for retouching, with which Milizia produces dense, stratified works, shaped by a process of subtraction and superimposition.

Two sculptures complete the exhibition itinerary. One is the upshot of a procedure of absolute reappraisal, culminating in a model of utopian architecture. Like the model of a neo-Renaissance building, it is proportioned and rigorous and yet uninhabited, uninhabitable, suspended between its original function and its current dysfunctionality. The second sculpture, made of bronze and produced thanks to a collaboration with the Battaglia Foundry, replicates and reinterprets a “controcuore” the fireplace cast-iron frame which, once again, displays on its surface the traces of the fusion between different cultures.

The exhibition is thus rooted in a logic of accumulation, collection, aggregation and coagulation. It is driven right to the threshold of chaos, yet without ever losing the discipline of analysis, of the skill which Milizia applies to every gesture, forever calibrated and, most of all, the outcome of a meticulous and encyclopaedic study. It’s a cycle of works on fragments and mutation. On the loss and reconquering of shapes and functions. On the transformative process of actions like translation, cut-ups, restoration, but also of time itself, in the inevitable shifting between past and present, and vice versa.

All this leads to a condition of constant instability, a source of inevitable restlessness, but also of an organic excitement in view of the unknown and that yet to be discovered.

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Controcuore
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Mario Milizia
Controcuore, 2017

Installation view - Courtesy of Viasaterna, Milano

Controcuore is the result of a combination of Milizia’s recent work, carried out using various media at different times, following the modus operandi of an artist who is both inclusive and disruptive, eclectic and specific.

“Controcuore” is the name of the cast-iron structure standing between the fireplace and its marble frame. An element of union, of protection, of adaptation, and also the title of the book in which Milizia brings together some of his poems written in 1992 and the analysis of his DNA, carried out through the Genographic Project with the aim of reconstructing his ancestral origins, which turned out to be Greek, Spanish and Portuguese. These poems have recently been translated into Latin and the languages of those countries, through a linguistic game which rewrites them, reinventing their sense. This is the origin of the seven tapestries on show, onto which the verses are sewn, originally produced using the cut-up technique. A technique drawn on at length, ever since the end of the 1950s, by Brion Gysin and William Borroughs, entailing the physical cutting up of one or more written texts in order to piece the elements back together as needs be.

Thus, poems and tapestries, together with twenty-five small-sized paintings created by spreading a blend of nail varnish and correction fluid onto cut-up pages from the catalogue of the permanent collection of the Carmen Thyssen Museum in Malaga. On the background, there are paintings by Spanish artists; in the foreground, the matter of a painting carried out using everyday substances, blown up and expanded. Chemicals from pigments and for retouching, with which Milizia produces dense, stratified works, shaped by a process of subtraction and superimposition.

Two sculptures complete the exhibition itinerary. One is the upshot of a procedure of absolute reappraisal, culminating in a model of utopian architecture. Like the model of a neo-Renaissance building, it is proportioned and rigorous and yet uninhabited, uninhabitable, suspended between its original function and its current dysfunctionality. The second sculpture, made of bronze and produced thanks to a collaboration with the Battaglia Foundry, replicates and reinterprets a “controcuore” the fireplace cast-iron frame which, once again, displays on its surface the traces of the fusion between different cultures.

The exhibition is thus rooted in a logic of accumulation, collection, aggregation and coagulation. It is driven right to the threshold of chaos, yet without ever losing the discipline of analysis, of the skill which Milizia applies to every gesture, forever calibrated and, most of all, the outcome of a meticulous and encyclopaedic study. It’s a cycle of works on fragments and mutation. On the loss and reconquering of shapes and functions. On the transformative process of actions like translation, cut-ups, restoration, but also of time itself, in the inevitable shifting between past and present, and vice versa.

All this leads to a condition of constant instability, a source of inevitable restlessness, but also of an organic excitement in view of the unknown and that yet to be discovered.

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Controcuore
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Mario Milizia
Controcuore, 2017

Patinated bronze
97 x 123 x 13 cm
Installation view, Viasaterna, Milano

Controcuore is the result of a combination of Milizia’s recent work, carried out using various media at different times, following the modus operandi of an artist who is both inclusive and disruptive, eclectic and specific.

“Controcuore” is the name of the cast-iron structure standing between the fireplace and its marble frame. An element of union, of protection, of adaptation, and also the title of the book in which Milizia brings together some of his poems written in 1992 and the analysis of his DNA, carried out through the Genographic Project with the aim of reconstructing his ancestral origins, which turned out to be Greek, Spanish and Portuguese. These poems have recently been translated into Latin and the languages of those countries, through a linguistic game which rewrites them, reinventing their sense. This is the origin of the seven tapestries on show, onto which the verses are sewn, originally produced using the cut-up technique. A technique drawn on at length, ever since the end of the 1950s, by Brion Gysin and William Borroughs, entailing the physical cutting up of one or more written texts in order to piece the elements back together as needs be.

Thus, poems and tapestries, together with twenty-five small-sized paintings created by spreading a blend of nail varnish and correction fluid onto cut-up pages from the catalogue of the permanent collection of the Carmen Thyssen Museum in Malaga. On the background, there are paintings by Spanish artists; in the foreground, the matter of a painting carried out using everyday substances, blown up and expanded. Chemicals from pigments and for retouching, with which Milizia produces dense, stratified works, shaped by a process of subtraction and superimposition.

Two sculptures complete the exhibition itinerary. One is the upshot of a procedure of absolute reappraisal, culminating in a model of utopian architecture. Like the model of a neo-Renaissance building, it is proportioned and rigorous and yet uninhabited, uninhabitable, suspended between its original function and its current dysfunctionality. The second sculpture, made of bronze and produced thanks to a collaboration with the Battaglia Foundry, replicates and reinterprets a “controcuore” the fireplace cast-iron frame which, once again, displays on its surface the traces of the fusion between different cultures.

The exhibition is thus rooted in a logic of accumulation, collection, aggregation and coagulation. It is driven right to the threshold of chaos, yet without ever losing the discipline of analysis, of the skill which Milizia applies to every gesture, forever calibrated and, most of all, the outcome of a meticulous and encyclopaedic study. It’s a cycle of works on fragments and mutation. On the loss and reconquering of shapes and functions. On the transformative process of actions like translation, cut-ups, restoration, but also of time itself, in the inevitable shifting between past and present, and vice versa.

All this leads to a condition of constant instability, a source of inevitable restlessness, but also of an organic excitement in view of the unknown and that yet to be discovered.

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Controcuore
permalink
+
Mario Milizia
Controcuore, 2017

Installation view - Courtesy of Viasaterna, Milano

Controcuore is the result of a combination of Milizia’s recent work, carried out using various media at different times, following the modus operandi of an artist who is both inclusive and disruptive, eclectic and specific.

“Controcuore” is the name of the cast-iron structure standing between the fireplace and its marble frame. An element of union, of protection, of adaptation, and also the title of the book in which Milizia brings together some of his poems written in 1992 and the analysis of his DNA, carried out through the Genographic Project with the aim of reconstructing his ancestral origins, which turned out to be Greek, Spanish and Portuguese. These poems have recently been translated into Latin and the languages of those countries, through a linguistic game which rewrites them, reinventing their sense. This is the origin of the seven tapestries on show, onto which the verses are sewn, originally produced using the cut-up technique. A technique drawn on at length, ever since the end of the 1950s, by Brion Gysin and William Borroughs, entailing the physical cutting up of one or more written texts in order to piece the elements back together as needs be.

Thus, poems and tapestries, together with twenty-five small-sized paintings created by spreading a blend of nail varnish and correction fluid onto cut-up pages from the catalogue of the permanent collection of the Carmen Thyssen Museum in Malaga. On the background, there are paintings by Spanish artists; in the foreground, the matter of a painting carried out using everyday substances, blown up and expanded. Chemicals from pigments and for retouching, with which Milizia produces dense, stratified works, shaped by a process of subtraction and superimposition.

Two sculptures complete the exhibition itinerary. One is the upshot of a procedure of absolute reappraisal, culminating in a model of utopian architecture. Like the model of a neo-Renaissance building, it is proportioned and rigorous and yet uninhabited, uninhabitable, suspended between its original function and its current dysfunctionality. The second sculpture, made of bronze and produced thanks to a collaboration with the Battaglia Foundry, replicates and reinterprets a “controcuore” the fireplace cast-iron frame which, once again, displays on its surface the traces of the fusion between different cultures.

The exhibition is thus rooted in a logic of accumulation, collection, aggregation and coagulation. It is driven right to the threshold of chaos, yet without ever losing the discipline of analysis, of the skill which Milizia applies to every gesture, forever calibrated and, most of all, the outcome of a meticulous and encyclopaedic study. It’s a cycle of works on fragments and mutation. On the loss and reconquering of shapes and functions. On the transformative process of actions like translation, cut-ups, restoration, but also of time itself, in the inevitable shifting between past and present, and vice versa.

All this leads to a condition of constant instability, a source of inevitable restlessness, but also of an organic excitement in view of the unknown and that yet to be discovered.

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Maxisequestro (Huge Seizure)
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Mario Milizia
Maxisequestro (Huge Seizure), 2013

Terracotta, plaster, glass and metallic objects, desks, telephone, office chair, computer, keyboard, toy guns, fabric.
295 x 230 x 153 cm

#mariomilizia #installation #art #contemporaryart #milan

“… Who knows if they tried to thwart that sale which today would be illegal? We’ll never know, but in any case it could have been the greatest huge seizure of all huge seizures in history. I have a feeling that Father Massarenti was a mere middleman, and that he wasn’t the real owner of that treasure. I want to look for documents on Roman antiquities prior to the colossal sale. I find an interesting book by a German archeologist, Wolfgang Helbig …”


“… Mario Milizia makes light of this idea of forgery, reproduction and looting, creating an imaginary collection of stolen art that is probably much better than a lot of the real art stolen from private homes or minor museums. What Milizia highlights with his project is the allure that surrounds a stolen work of art, in spite of its real economic and aesthetic value. Stolen goods gain some kind of bonus by the simple fact that they have been filched, just as figs picked directly from the tree taste better than those you pay for at the fruit stand. After all, if something – particularly art – is worth stealing, then it must have some kind of value. In fact, if we forget that Milizia’s project is artificial and look at it as an assembly of real works of art, we experience some kind of real visual pleasure. The value of art is about information. We never desire a work of art so much as when it has gone missing. Milizia’s operation precisely addresses the mystery of longing for something or someone only once they are no longer available …”
Francesco Bonami

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